[Review] Their Finest – Watch Their Finest 123movies online free

Watch Their Finest online free – Shows life under the Blitz, how movies get made (sell out, kiss butt, make up stuff as you go along) and how Women were viewed in England in WW!!. We laughed and cried where we were supposed to. Bill Nighy deserves Award Consideration for showing “Acting” is an Art. I will seek out the makers of this Film and hope to enjoy their work.

Genre: Comedy, Drama, Romance, War

Actor: Gemma Arterton, Sam Claflin, Bill Nighy, Jack Huston, Paul Ritter, Rachael Stirling, Richard E. Grant, Henry Goodman, Jake Lacy, Jeremy Irons, Eddie Marsan, Helen McCrory, Hubert Burton, Claudia Jessie, Stephanie Hyam, Michael Marcus, Gordon Brown, Patrick Gibson, Julia Lewis, Lily Knight, Francesca Knight, Clive Russell, Jay Simpson, Richard Syms, Darren Clarke, Cathy Murphy, Emma Cunniffe, Nicholas Murchie, Amanda Root, Ed Birch, Lee Whitlock, Mossie Smith, Letty Butler, Nell Barlow, Rebecca Saire, Frances Jeater, Stephen Boswell, Joanna Brookes, Patrick Osborne, Gaby Chiappe, Amanda Fairbank-Hynes, Bella Ava Georgiou, Alfie Stewart, Ellie Haddington, Liliana Gane, Richard Bevan, Natalia Ryumina, Steve Carroll, Kathleen Harrison, Kornelia Horvath, Katie Jackson, Amanda Pepper, Miles Richardson

Director: Lone Scherfig

Country: UK, Sweden

Runtime: 117 min

Release: 2016

Review Their Finest – Watch Their Finest 123movies online free

Review Their Finest by bob-the-movie-man – Keep calm and keep writing

In a well-mined category, “Their Finest” is a World War 2 comedy/drama telling a tale I haven’t seen told before: the story behind the British Ministry of Information and their drive to produce propaganda films that support morale and promote positive messages in a time of national crisis. For it is 1940 and London is under nightly attack by the Luftwaffe during the time known as “The Blitz”. Unfortunately the Ministry is run by a bunch of toffs, and their output is laughably misaligned with the working class population, and especially the female population:  with their husbands fighting overseas, these two groups are fast becoming one and the same. For women are finding and enjoying new empowerment and freedom in being socially unshackled from the kitchen sink.

Enter Catrin Cole (Gemma Arterton, “The Girl with all the Gifts”) who is one such woman arriving to a dangerous London from South Wales to live with struggling disabled artist Ellis (Jack Huston, grandson of John Huston). Catrin, stretching the truth a little, brings a stirring ‘true’ tale of derring-do about the Dunkirk evacuation to the Ministry’s attention. She is then employed to “write the slop” (the woman’s dialogue) in the writing team headed by spiky Tom Buckley (Sam Claflin, “Me Before You”).

One of the stars of the film within the film is ‘Uncle Frank’ played by the aging but charismatic actor Ambrose Hilliard (Bill Nighy, “Dad’s Army”, “Love Actually”). Catrin proves her worth by pouring oil on troubled waters as the army insist on the introduction of an American airman (Jake Lacy, “Carol”) to the stressful mix. An attraction builds between Catrin and Tom, but how will the love triangle resolve itself?

As you might expect if you’ve seen the trailer the film is, in the main, warm and funny with Gemma Arterton just gorgeously huggable as the determined young lady trying to make it in a misogynistic 40’s world of work. Arterton is just the perfect “girl next door”. But mixed in with the humour and the romantic storyline is a harsh sprinkling of the trials of war and not a little heartbreak occurs.  This is at least a 5 tissue movie.

Claflin, who is having a strong year with appearances in a wide range of films, is also eminently watchable. One of his best scenes is a speech with Arterton about “why people love the movies”, a theory that the film merrily and memorably drives a stake through the heart of!

Elsewhere Lacy is hilarious as the hapless airman with zero acting ability; Helen McCrory (“Harry Potter”) as Sophie Smith vamps it up wonderfully as the potential Polish love interest for Hilliard; Richard E Grant (“Logan”) and Jeremy Irons (“The Lion King”, “Die Hard: with a Vengeance”) pop up in useful cameos and Eddie Marsan (“Sherlock Holmes”) is also touching as Hilliard’s long-suffering agent.

But it is Bill Nighy’s Hilliard who carries most of the wit and humour of the film with his pompous thespian persona, basking in the dwindling glory of a much loved series of “Inspector Lynley” films. With his pomposity progressively warming under the thawing effect of Sophie and Catrin, you have to love him!  Bill Nighy is, well, Bill Nighy. Hugh Grant gets it (unfairly) in the neck for “being Hugh Grant” in every film, but this pales in comparison with Nighy’s performances!  But who cares: his kooky delivery is just delightful and he is a national treasure!

Slightly less convincing for me was Rachael Stirling’s role as a butch ministry busybody with more than a hint of the lesbian about her.  Stirling’s performance in the role is fine, but would this really have been so blatant in 1940’s Britain?  This didn’t really ring true for me.

While the film gamely tries to pull off London in the Blitz the film’s limited budget (around £25m) makes everything feel a little underpowered and ’empty’:  a few hundred more extras in the Underground/Blitz scenes for example would have helped no end.

However, the special effects crew do their best and the cinematography by Sebastian Blenkov (“The Riot Club”) suitably conveys the mood:  a scene where Catrin gets caught in a bomb blast outside a clothes shop is particularly moving.

As with all comedy dramas, sometimes the bedfellows lie uncomfortably with each other, and a couple of plot twists: one highly predictable; one shockingly unpredictable make this a non-linear watch. This roller-coaster of a script by Gaby Chiappe, in an excellent feature film debut (she actually also has a cameo in the propaganda “carrot film”!), undeniably adds interest and makes the film more memorable. However (I know from personal experience) that the twist did not please everyone in the audience!

Despite its occasionally uneven tone, this is a really enjoyable watch (particularly for more mature audiences) and Danish director Lone Scherfig finally has a vehicle that matches the quality of her much praised Carey Mulligan vehicle “An Education”.

Review Their Finest by Daniel Ponga – Everything you were expecting … except it isn’t

Everything you were expecting … except it isn’t. Their Finest is very coherent, with simple yet relatable and sympathetic characters, the story moves forward as a reaction of the universe and is not necessarily character-driven, with conflict usually being originated from authority figures such as the producers/the studio. Their Finest not only uses the war to drive the plot forward and smartly show how it constantly affects the characters, but also makes a statement on how studios and producers control the creative process to win the audience’s approval and give a positive image of the allies. The humor of the film is simple and sometimes silly in a way that it does not always add anything to the story. That being said, the simplicity of it does add a nice layer of happiness to a story that is not meant to be over-dramatic, and Bill Nighy’s performance and character nails in the comedic aspect. Overall, Their Finest is an above-average romantic film. It is not groundbreaking and might feel like many films we’ve seen before, but will please the audience with a romantic story and a very well thought conclusion that gives a bittersweet aftertaste.

Review Their Finest by subxerogravity Good movie about people who make good movies.

It’s a movie within a movie. I feel in general, a movie about movies is a good topic for a movie. People love to hear stories about how the movies works. I know personally I’m a sucker for this type of drama.

Based on a book called Their Finest Hour and a Half, which I think is a better title, Their Finest stars Gemma Arterton in a movie that takes place during World War 2 in England, when women join the workforce in order keep the world going that was coming to a halt do to the Blitzkrieg. In this case Arterton’s character Catrin Cole, a woman working for a newspaper that leads to an opportunity to write a screenplay for a movie.

What I like about the movie is that it’s a funny story about how a screenplay is created. They basically hired Catrin Cole to tell the story of the war from a women’s perspective, namely the true story of a pair of twins who attempted to use their boat to help rescue soldiers in France, but the true story is not good enough propaganda to get the citizens of Britain into the cause, so she has to embellish what happen.

As the writing progressed, they keep getting stopped by someone, weather it was the producer or The Secretary of War to add new things so that they can appeal to the masses, a very interesting process made hilarious by the movie.

The whole film is a satire on the film industry of 1940s Great Britain that’s still true today. Their Finest also has some romance in it, as Cartin becomes attracted to her fellow writer on the screenplay, Tom Buckley. The film is also a good example about how female roles in society started to shift during World War II.

Bill Nighy was as fun to watch as I was told. He plays an aging actor finding his popularity is stuck on something he did years ago, and like Catin finds an opportunity within the war.

Overall, I really enjoined the movie. Gemma Arterton made a really good lead actress and the movie altogether was a great story.

Review Their Finest by CineMuseFilms – A delightfully nostalgic period drama of movie-making and romance during the London Blitz.

Their Finest (2016) is one of several recent films that remediate women’s conspicuous absence from war history. It stands tall in the war film genre, as well as in period drama and feminist film. With beautiful cinematography, it nostalgically evokes the tensions and deprivations of London in 1940. At the same time, it provides an instructive insight into the making of a war propaganda movie in the early days of film history.

The two-part plot line is based on the experiences of young Welshwoman Catrin Cole (Gemma Arterton) who unexpectedly lands a movie scriptwriting job in the British Ministry of Information. The first half of Their Finest is about the planning of a movie for boosting morale and support for the war; the second is its actual filming. The thread of continuity is Catrin’s relationships; first with her war-damaged artist lover Ellis Cole (Jack Huston) and then her senior scriptwriter Tom Buckley (Sam Claflin). Catrin has been hired to write “the slops”, a term used to describe women’s interests and views. In wartime, things change unexpectedly and the movie shifts from an emphasis on women, to a general rallying call to the nation, and then to an appeal to America to join the war. The casting of stars shifts from heroines to a past-his-prime actor Ambrose Hilliard (Bill Nighy) to an American fighter pilot who turns out to have appalling acting skills. By the end of Their Finest, we are watching the finished movie being screened in public having witnessed how it was made and the effect it has on the people involved.

The making of a war movie within a war film is an original and clever cinematic construction. The storyboarding, casting, and filming of the movie provide self-reflexive insights into movie-making itself. This is a multi-genre film, combining war and filmmaking history, period drama and romance, but it’s inaccurate to call it a comedy. Most of the humour comes from Bill Nighy’s portrayal of the pompous British artistic classes and his fading light as an actor. In an otherwise well-directed film, Nighy often overshadows its star, Gemma Arterton, who is the film’s beating heart and champion for women. Nighy has that rare ability to fill any space into which he walks, but this means that the film’s excellent cast shine only when he is off screen.

There are many reasons for liking this film, including its originality, acting and filming. It poignantly captures the fragility of life in the London Blitz with detailed attention to nostalgic sets, costumes, and mannerisms of an era. The colour palette’s de-saturated tonality reflects the sombre mood of the nation and the narrative covers a lot of ground. It is ironic, however, that a film dedicated to recognising the role of women in history should be so under the comedic influence of a veteran male actor. Despite its efforts to be otherwise, this will be remembered as a Bill Nighy film. For many, that’s not a bad thing.

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