The Spectacular Now review by – Watch The Spectacular Now 365movies free online

Watch The Spectacular Now 365movies free online – I finally had the opportunity to watch this movie, after months of wanting to. This movie was so amazing, I had the feels the entire movie. The characters’ personalities were so perfectly acted out, the actors did an impeccable job or portraying their characters. I felt like they were real people, it was insane how amazingly real it all seemed. The way the movie revolves around Sutter and drowns out school life is very interesting as well. It gives your the perspective that, not in all kids’ lives is school the main focus. Sometimes family issues, or mainly in his case, partying and drinking, can draw teens attention. It was also amazing how they connected his dad’s personality to Sutter’s. They both said the same phrases a lot, and his dad was a drunkard as well. It’s evident later in the movie Sutter realizes he will end up the same way. I am honestly at a loss of words, the movie needs to be watched by teenagers worldwide, for a truly heart felt story.

The Spectacular Now review by – Watch The Spectacular Now 365movies free online

The Spectacular Now review by David Ferguson – A rare worthy entry into teen Dramedy genre

Greetings again from the darkness. Coming-of-age teen dramas with a comedic flair that speak to that tumultuous period of life are rarely worthy of discussion. The exceptions hover film greatness: Rebel Without a Cause, Fast Times at Ridgemont High, Dazed and Confused, The Breakfast Club, and Say Anything … Along comes young director James Ponsoldt and his adaptation of Tim Tharp’s novel. While not perfect and falling just short of the level of those classics, it is nonetheless a welcome addition and quite interesting.

It’s tempting to call Sutter (played by up-and-comer Miles Teller) a happy-go-lucky kid. He’s the frat boy type – quick with a quip, smooth with the parents and girls, and the envy of the masses. That term would be misapplied to a kid who not only is never without his flask, but also gives them as gifts. He uses his wit and booze to dull the pain of his aimless existence. We see his lackadaisical efforts at completing a college admission form, and it’s used as a plot device to track Sutter’s progression through the film.

Brie Larson is terrific as Sutter’s perfect match … right up until she decides that his philosophy of living in the now (even spectacularly) doesn’t leave hope for much of a future. After an extreme night of drinking and partying, Sutter gets awakened while laying in a neighbor’s front yard. Shailene Woodley (The Descendants) is Aimee Finicky who recognizes the popular Sutter, even though he has no idea who she is. Slowly, the two connect on a level previously unknown to either … some good, some not so wise (just like real teenagers).

This couple of opposites learn much from each other, and soon enough, Sutter is confronting his long last father (Kyle Chandler). No real surprises what he discovers, but it’s a life lesson that must be learned. Sutter seeks more from his remaining family – a big sister (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) who escaped the grind, and a workaholic mom (Jennifer Jason Leigh) doing her best to provide hope for Sutter.

The script is co-written by Scott Neustadter and Michael Weber who also wrote (500) Days of Summer. John Hughes and Cameron Crowe proved they could present teen dilemmas in an entertaining way, and this one follows the same structure. This is a dialogue-heavy story as Sutter and Aimee struggle alone and together to figure out life’s next steps.

I will say that for the first few minutes of the movie, I found Sutter to be the kind of guy that I would typically have no interest in. Tip of the cap to the filmmakers and Miles Teller for turning that around. It should also be noted that Shailene Woodley is so naturally affecting, that her character never comes across as anything but sincere. Given the state of today’s mainstream coming of age stories, this one definitely deserves a look and could gather some attention come awards time.

The Spectacular Now review by bengantz – Smells Like Teen Spirit

I was lucky enough to see The Spectacular Now at an advance screening, and walking out, I had the unmistakable feeling that I can only describe as a “good movie buzz.” You feel a little light on your feet. You’re thinking not only about what you’ve just seen, but how it relates to you. It’s a heartfelt story that distills all of the beauty, tenderness, and apocalyptic bleakness of youth into a 95 minute love story that portrays teenagers in the most honest way since the films of John Hughes. The Spectacular Now won Sundance’s special jury prize for acting and within minutes, the reason for this becomes apparent. Beautiful, naturalistic performances all around. Miles Teller portrays Sutter Keely with charisma and an effervescent charm while Shailene Woodley imbues Aimee Finicky with a tender shyness that makes her character incredibly endearing. When you watch the two of them on screen together, their chemistry is not just apparent, it’s intoxicating. And it’s not just a movie held together by its performances. Scott Neustadter and Michael Weber have written an incredible screenplay with flawed yet likable characters you can’t help but root for, and James Ponsoldt has delicately directed the script to make his best movie to date. The Spectacular Now is much more than another indie darling. It has breathed life into the “teen movie” genre by treating its characters with maturity and honesty. This is the coming of age movie of our time.

The Spectacular Now review by thereisnothingleft – A refreshing take

I found The Spectacular now to be a very refreshing movie to watch. We’ve all seen the coming of age high school romance blahblahblah thing before, but the film takes you where you didn’t expect it to go, and that is one of the qualities that makes it a great experience.

Miles Teller and Shailene Woodley are fantastic, particularly Woodley. I don’t know how you can’t be a fan of Teller, he is his usual self in this one and adds even more depth to himself. Woodley’s as real as it gets in her performance. I didn’t notice it until my second viewing in terms of how natural she was, but she was terrific.

Those two are already great to cast as leads, but it’s always fun when the casting for anything is just all around fantastic. Tamper your expectations a bit because it’s all about the leads in this one, but Coach Taylor, Bubbles, and Saul Goodman are great in the limited time they are on screen. I mean, Kyle Chandler, Andre Royo, and Bob Odenkirk.

The emotional impact of this film really hit me towards the end, and certain factors are very predominant in the movie that you definitely do not expect. Without spoiling anything, I’ll just say take away a lot of the laughs you were expecting, and brace yourself for the feels and a very serious tone. This may damper some who came for this because it’s from the dudes who did 500 Days of Summer, but It’s still very good and the movie is actually funny in the spots it wants to be.

Overall, I think this is absolutely a film you want to see. Where the story goes widens the appeal of this movie by far in my opinion, so if you were just not going to see it or judged it by the trailers, don’t. Give it a shot.

The Spectacular Now review by siderite – Finally a good teen movie

I wanted to see this film to soothe my wife. She usually loves adolescent romance stuff, so I thought I would suffer through it. Instead, I ended up liking it more than she did.

The thing about romance films and adolescence films in particular is that the kids are presented like complete idiots, like aliens from the planet Dumb. In order to keep up with this superficial image all other characters must act the same. The result is a complete fake.

The Spectacular Now is nothing like that. From the start it portrays teens as complex, intelligent, troubled about their past and their future, maybe laid back alcoholics or chronically shy or overachievers with low self esteem. And they all interact like human beings. It’s a joy to see a film like this.

I also loved that they didn’t use the cheap tricks of romance movies in general. No evil adversary to define the character as good, no ultimate goal to direct the entire film from point A to point B, no artificial accidents or catastrophes to move people out of their stupor, no highschool cliques, no Facebook or Twitter dramas. Instead, normal people doing normal stuff, trying to get over themselves and have a happy life.

The film was not without its flaws. It was a little too slow, for once. It only lasted an hour and a half but it felt like more. Also there is a somewhat seamless jump of a few years that takes the viewer by surprise (I still don’t know when it happened). Also, I am a bit grumpy today, the film probably deserved a 9. Go watch it!

The Spectacular Now review by MisterWhiplash – The Spectacular Young at Heart

The Spectacular Now is a coming-of-age drama mixed with young love story about Sutter (Miles Kelly, an interesting, uncynical young find who can communicate a lot of different sides to this character without coming off too fresh or overwrought) who starts off obnoxious (but in the way that is believable to the way that teenage boys can get obnoxious) and in the wake of a failed relationship meets a good, sweet girl, Amy, and a natural relationship unfolds in their senior year of High School. While this is going on, he has a problem with alcohol – which extends to Amy – and about a past history that Sutter has to confront with a dead- beat father.

The film that is very well written (based on a book but having that same quality in the dialog and story turns that speaks to their intelligence at navigating conventions) without being show-offy, and performances that feel raw and sensitive and try to avoid a lot of clichés (or that Hollywood way of showing teenagers “like we think they are” as opposed to how they are closer to life), and a strong dramatic story about young love and overcoming the flaws in yourself.

It’s not perfect, and has a few little things with the alcohol element to the film that irked me (which is much bigger than what you may realize seeing the trailer, much more actually, it’s really a companion piece with this director’s previous movie Smashed which is also about boozing), but its real and honest and that’s so rare to find in a teenage story like this. Woodley has a long career ahead of her, and has that great distinction of being naturally pretty, dramatically intuitive, and yet is not SO pretty that you can’t accept her as a cute teenager girl (or… dare I say Mary Jane in the next Spiderman movie?) Go see it – it’s not top 10 of the year great, but it’s great in the ways that matter for a story like this.

See more:

Leave a Reply