Isle of Dogs 123movies – Watch Isle of Dogs online free

Watch Isle of Dogs online freeI walked into the theater with a sort of, I wonder if this will be whimsical, or a bit too avant-garde for my tastes. Well I was captivated and although the child behind was kicking my seat, I was unable to pay attention to anything except this true gem. A unique story line copuled with a fantastic cast (let alone the seamless stop motion), made this the best movie I’ve seen in quite some time. People actually applauded at the end! Haven’t heard that in years! Check it out! You’ll be glad you did!

Isle of Dogs 123movies – Watch Isle of Dogs online free

Isle of Dogs review by Edwardfdzzz – A flash of absorbing and unconventional creativity

Wes Anderson’s the Isle of Dogs is a creatively made, character driven comedy story, with a melancholic and satirical undertone.

The animation, editing and sound design are the main brass here, and are used to great effect to communicate much of the story.

The Isle of Dogs is on the nose about its storytelling, obligatory moments such as flashbacks and story structure are highlighted as to get necessary information communicated as quickly as possible, so the film can get back to living in the moment, exploring its quirky characters and scenery. There is an air of self awareness about the story that, rather than disengaging, is used to draw the viewer more into the inherently ridiculous story. There is an artistry to suspending disbelief, and this is an endlessly creative way to get the audience to do so. To make them aware they’re getting conventional information or that certain things are ridiculous plot details, even tropes, and highlighting such details to actually enhance the storytelling rather than distance the viewer. After a point you accept the strange pacing and rapid editing style as part of the universe of this film, and when you do , The Isle of Dogs is an audio-visual experience so cathartic you won’t want it to end.

Isle of Dogs review by Alexander_Blanchett – A true gem! Best Wes Anderson since “The Royal Tenenbaums”

Another highlight in Wes Anderson’s filmography. And honestly his best film since “The Royal Tenenbaums”. A wonderful and inspired animation comedy that lives from the typical Wes Anderson wit. The stop motion was perfect and it was created with many beautiful details. The voice performances were pitch perfect and the right actors were chosen. Bryan Cranston was terrific and so was Edward Norton, Frances McDormand, Greta Gerwig, Jeff Goldblum and Tilda Swinton (tho her character deserved way more screen time. The soundtrack was fantastic, especially the score was perfectly created. The screenplay is among Wes Anderson’s best work to date. I loved the editing and general look of it. There are nice and funny twists throughout the whole film. And in the end it has an important message to tell. Its a winner film and I am sure it will make its mark at the box office, with the critics and also at next years Oscars (especially in the best animation feature category). I already loved “Fantastic Mr. Fox” but with “Isles of Dogs” Anderson was able to top it. Highly recommended.

Isle of Dogs review by neener3707 – Another Charming And Quirky Wes Anderson Creation

I really enjoyed this wonderful little film that was such a departure in a way for director Wes Anderson, yet his style is still readily obvious. I saw this at a midnight showing and I can tell you, everyone walking out of the theater was raving and talking about how great it was, And it was, such a charming a cute adventure of a story that was a total surprise, in the sense of a surprise to see Anderson making an animated film. I was so exited for the film and it really was in no way a disappointment, I thoroughly enjoyed his latest work, in fact, I might go see it twice, which is rare for me. In the second paragraph I will discuss a little more about what exactly I liked about it, but in general this was a damn good film that demands a viewing.

Wes Anderson’s style is so honed in this film despite it being animated. The use of colors and symmetry are still plainly obvious, the color and design of things very consistent giving a believable world for the film to be set in. Each one of the characters was deeply developed and fascinating while also working off many of the other characters. The writing is sharp, intelligent, and very well written in the style of many of the other Anderson classics. So basically if you are a fan of his style, then you will be delighted to see this movie that is the personification of Wes Anderson’s style.

Isle of Dogs review by Jack C – Another Wes Anderson Classic

We absolutely loved Isle of Dogs. All of your classic Wes Anderson tropes of symmetrical shots, zany dialogue, and an outlandish take on underdogs (pun intended) rebelling against the system are present. The Japanese themes were artistically delivered as well as one could expect, without resorting to base stereotypes.

We are taken to Japan, where a dog flu epidemic has turned a city against its furry friends. The evil dog hating mayor has rounded up all dogs and exiled them to trash island, where they live in filth and suffering. Atari, the adopted son of the Mayor, flies a plane onto the island to rescue his dog. Hilarity and poignant moments ensue.

Don’t miss this one if you are a Wes Anderson fan, or simply want a great comedy. Certain scenes may bother kids below the age of 5. The subtle allegory on an evil leader stirring the pot against the most helpless in our society is timely and well wrought.

Isle of Dogs review by GODZILLA_Alpha_Predator – A Wes Anderson-ish underdog tale

If you are expecting symmetrical compositions, deadpan humor and the occasional sudden bursts of uncomfortable violence with some emotion throw in then you know you have stepped into a Wes Anderson film. And that’s what Isle of Dogs but a lot more political and serious then you might expect.

Isle of Dogs is set in an alternate future Japan where Mayor Kobayashi uses fear and paranoia to manipulate the people of Megasaki City to banish his family’s ancient mortal enemy: dogs. With the dog population carrying a contagious flu, Kobayashi tricks the citizens into believing Trash Island (literally an island made of trash) is the only place the infected canines can be quarantined. But through the actions of his distant adopted nephew Atari to rescue his bodyguard dog Spots, he gains the aid from a pack of Alpha dogs Rex, Boss, Duke, King and reluctantly the stray Chief.

At first it may seem like it’s a boy and his dog storyline but Anderson goes deeper then that. It is truly about the stray Chief finding his place in a xenophobic world. Because of his status as a wild stray, Chief isn’t trustful of human society and sees the civilized democratic voting method by the other Alpha pack members as being more problematic then progressive. Chief’s hatred for civilized politics becomes justified when we see how the people of Megasaki’s decision-making process is very much influenced by the latest rumour and propaganda to portray the dogs as the threat to society. Its there that Anderson’s political points become very clear that reflect on what is going within the political system today. By making most of the Japanese characters speak in their natural language while dogs are translated into English, it creates a language barrier that shows Atari as an outsider. This displays the divide that has been made between dog and mankind. But when Atari’s noble actions speak louder then his own words, his kindness and sympathy changes Chief’s view and he finds a greater purpose in life beyond just trying to survive. There it becomes more of a classic tale of a group of underdogs (no pun intended) fighting against people in power.

Where Isle of Dogs really succeeds beyond its politics is its world-building. Anderson creates so much history around Trash Island. His attention to detail makes each layer and cube of garbage feels so real and tactile. As the characters travel across the island, more is revealed of its tragic history to reflect on the dog population’s own blight. Megasaki City is a bright shinning utopia that is in political disarray that has divided the people between the corrupted Kobayashi clan and the dog-supporting protesters.

Where Isle of Dogs I think does struggle with is that the Japanese characters outside Atari don’t get as much characterizations and are more painted as broad archetypes. And since Anderson does not use that much subtitles for the Japanese dialogue, it can feel a bit disconnecting since I only speak English. It feels even more awkward the character that gets the most depth in Megasaki is the white American English-speaking foreign-exchange student Tracy Walker.

Not sure if it’s a negative but Anderson, with lack of subtly and maybe its intentional, makes cats or at least cat people as the obvious villains. The fact that every evil member of the Kobayashi family has a devlish-looking cat as a pet to the mayor himself revealing to have a huge back tattoo of cats, it could shrugged the cat people community the wrong way.

While it does not top his previous film Grand Budapest Hotel, Isle of Dogs is more spectacular, smarter and richer in detail then Wes Anderson’s previous stop-motion film Fantastic Mr. Fox. It’s a movie that I think adults will take more in then kids because of the heavy subject matter and dark themes.

Isle of Dogs review by Statuskuo – Trump Era Criticism Wrapped In Hope and Joy

This is a thinly veiled attack on Trump’s position of eradicating the illegal immigrant debate. The solution they believe the Right want is to deport them to an island where you can rally society to murder them off later. My response “coooool” do that. But to head-in-the-clouds artist such as Wes Anderson, the solution is peace and love. A great message yet…a child’s view of the world. Though absolutely adorable and fun, my political stance has nothing to do with the fact that Anderson has made an innovative, nearly flawless movie that doesn’t overcooked the term “visionary.” It is EXACTLY that. An incredible blend of craft and storytelling which I’ve been starved for. This is, in fact, a child’s perspective of politics when adult thinking is magnified. Who we see are embodied in “domesticated” canines (cough…immigrants…cough) who have been displaced due to no fault of their own. Society has decided to back the cuter more accessible cat society, and therefore, dogs are deemed pests. They are deported (yes, I’m using that word) to an island that might as well be a leper colony. A young boy runs away to the island to search for the dog who offered comfort after an unfortunate event. Friendship, kindness and empathy. A lot we can use today on both sides of your political leanings. I’m not suggesting you take away the same message. You can still enjoy as a simple diorama storytelling Anderson is known for. You can’t deny the artistry. Political discord or not.

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